Monday, 18 April 2016

The Communal Utopia of Marinaleda


Marinaleda is a town located in Spain. Marinaleda supported around 2800 people. Led by the charismatic mayor, Juan Manuel Sanchez Gordillo, the village undergone a collective-coop experience. During the financial crisis in 2008, he organized the people to raid supermarkets and stored it in a newly-established local food bank. He said that “there are many families who cannot afford to eat,” he argued. “In the 21st century this is an absolute disgrace. Food is a right, not something which you speculate.” After that, he initiated the great experiment of collective living. Some media dub it the “communal utopia” of south Spain. There are several reasons why it is called that way. First, there were no unemployment in Marinaleda. Everyone worked in a collective-owned cooperative based on their own choosing such as olive plantations or some restaurants for tourists. Second, there were virtually no crime in Marinaleda. Police were unneeded there because people of Marinaleda relies on self-restrictions and vigorous ethical and principal educations which includes humanism, feminism, and tolerancy. Lastly, they live in a prosperous condition. During the crisis there were 690.000 empty properties, due to bank foreclosures. By now almost all of them has been turned into a productive collective space, mostly for agrarians. On top of that, everyone paid by a minimum wage of 1200 Euros. Marinaleda is a great place to live. It is quite inspiring for me because I realize that there is something wrong with an economic system in which food are plenty but so are the hungry.

No comments:

Post a Comment